Chapman homepage, 2003
 A second-tier landing page design.  Knocking out all the backgrounds for those images in the left column was extremely time-consuming.      To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the  Wayback Machine . 
 Another second-tier landing page.     To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the  Wayback Machine . 
 We had to split the admissions welcome page into two sections, to accommodate the students on the Orange campus, and those at the satellite campuses of University College. (You might know it as Brandman University, now.)      To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the  Wayback Machine . 
 To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the  Wayback Machine . 
 The student resources page, broken down by type of student.   To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the  Wayback Machine . 
Chapman homepage, 2003

This iteration of the Chapman University site was a giant step forward from the previous static site design. Here's the homepage, which was customized for each user who'd made a profile. Different sections showed content dependent on the user's likes, interests, place in the admissions process, alumni status, etc. 

 

To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the Wayback Machine

A second-tier landing page design.

Knocking out all the backgrounds for those images in the left column was extremely time-consuming. 

 

To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the Wayback Machine

Another second-tier landing page.

 

To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the Wayback Machine

We had to split the admissions welcome page into two sections, to accommodate the students on the Orange campus, and those at the satellite campuses of University College. (You might know it as Brandman University, now.) 

 

To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the Wayback Machine

To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the Wayback Machine

The student resources page, broken down by type of student. 

To truly see how the site functioned, I suggest using the Wayback Machine